Mystic Faerie Tarot Review (All 78 Cards Revealed)

4.9/5 - (7 votes)

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Mystic Faerie Tarot Review

The Mystic Faerie Tarot deck is easy to use for beginners. The images are easy to understand, free of occult symbolism and yet deeply symbolic. Linda Ravenscroft tried to get rid of Rider Waite imagery, which often rules the imagination of deck builders. Her card images are unique and distinctive in many places. Even advanced Tarot readers should find this useful information. It will also give them a chance to break out of their learned patterns and learn more about Tarot meanings. The Mystic Faerie Tarot’s symbolism blends seamlessly into the natural environment of cards, unlike other decks that make it clear what symbol is which. A simple bubble on the Fool card communicates an important message.

The printed colors are far richer than the washed out colors in this site’s scans. I don’t mean to deny that the watercolor art is beautiful, but the scans appear to be too exposed. The card art, however, is breathtakingly beautiful. I liked the addition of gold ink to the borders.

Although the box appears solid for a paper tarot, I am not sure how it will last over time. The organza bag in gold for the cards is beautiful and just the right size. It’s not too small that you can’t draw the lid or get the cards in and it doesn’t get in the way of the cards. It was very surprising how large the book was. I hate flipping through tiny booklets with decks and it can be a hassle to keep them open while trying to read them. The Mystic Faerie Tarot companion book measures approximately the same size as that of the entire set. I have not measured it but I believe it to be about 8×5 inches. The sturdy paperback has a shiny, colored cover and is easy to read. Each card is printed at full size, or almost to the same size as its accompanying text in this book. They are all in black and/or white.

It was a big leap of faith because I had never heard of it, read any reviews or looked into it. Also, the box pictures only showed the major arcana cards so I was worried that the minors wouldn’t be fully illustrated. It felt right so I purchased the set. The minors are fully illustrated with scenes and might be my favorite part of the set. 

Mystic Faerie Tarot Card Details

Each minor arcana suit is based on a specific faerie tale. The suit of Wands, represented by actual wands, tells the story of two faeries embarking on an adventure to search for a Phoenix. The suit of swords, represented by rose thorns, tells the story of a nymph (two fae from different races) and their love story. The suit of cups, which is represented by water lily flowers, follows a fae lady who loses her village in the forest and starts again and is then befriende by mice. Although the stories don’t all end in happy ways, which is what I didn’t expect from a deck of faeries, they all have universally applicable morals that can be applied to the real world. It sometimes seems that the Rider-Waite meaning for a minor matches the Rider-Waite meaning, but this is not the case everywhere.

This faerie story layout is for minors. It means that they will be difficult to read if they are not illustrations to a story. Fortunately, the stories are short and sweet. This is a reminder that you must read the companion book from cover to cover before you attempt to use the cards. I don’t recommend this with any other companion books or booklets.

The deck’s concept and author stated that the deck was created to be a faerie deck. However, we are humans and cannot achieve perfect balance with the natural world. The fae can help us understand what the ideal is and how we can achieve it. This idea is amazing.

Even though I am the daughter of a scientist and a doctor, there are days when I feel skeptical about the Tarot. These days are rare, and they always go away. This speaks volumes about the quality of the deck and the execution of the book set. I never felt silly reading the book or taking advice from faeries.

Let’s now move on to the majors. These majors are beautifully illustrated with rich watercolors and exceptional detail. A Priestess is available instead of a High Priestess. There’s also a Priestess and a Hierophant. The Hanged Fae is the alternative to The Hanged Man. Although the meanings of this deck are slightly different from traditional Rider-Waite cards, it is worth reading the book first. However, they make a lot of sense and are easy to remember. The major cards in this deck that I love are: Strength (8 not 11), The Tower, The Moon & The Sun and Judgement. The deck’s Strength rides on a dragon. This is similar to the dragon in the story about the suit of wands. The Tower is being overthrown by nature in all directions. This book provides one of the most detailed explanations I’ve ever seen. The Moon and Sun share a beautiful parallel structure. Both are represented by women fae whose hair transforms into the orb they represent. This book provides a wonderful explanation that could change how I read other decks. It is similar to Priestess/Priest, but it is also very well done. The description of the Judgement card in this deck makes it stand out. Judgement has been a difficult card for me to relate to personally. The deck is stunningly beautiful. The book enhances the experience by allowing you to use your other senses, so the meanings can be reconnected in your mind and memory. They are more relatable because they have slight twists to traditional card meanings that make them more relevant to the world of fae.

Knave is used instead of Page for the court cards. You will have Knave Knight Queen King. These cards are very faithful to the traditional meanings of the tarot, with each suit representing a specific part of human experience and each rank representing a certain level maturity and experience in that area.

The introduction to the book gives a good overview of Tarot. It also introduces some things I found useful and would like to hear more. There are a few original spreads at the end of this book. I’m particularly interested in Acorn to Oak, which is designed to help you determine the best way to achieve a goal, and the Birthday Sunflower Spread. These spreads can be read every year and give a general overview.

Overall, this deck is highly recommended for beginners and children in tarot (the symbolisms are easy to grasp and well explained in the accompanying stories, descriptions and stories. The stories will make learning tarot fun and easier for both new readers and those who have been reading tarot for some time.

Mystic Faerie Tarot Review

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